Overview

Alexandria Museum of Art Collections Endowment and partial Gift of the Ida and Hugh Kohlmeyer Foundation 2002.01

Pictographic symbols stacked in a totem-like form suggest an emblem of respect and object of spiritual significance influenced by Kohlmeyer’s interest in ancient cultures. Known for her own visual vocabulary of glyphs, calligraphic marks, signs, and symbols, she saw her art as an open-ended code or ideogram for the viewer to interpret.

Kohlmeyer began transforming her colorful, abstract canvases into metal sculptures the last fifteen years of her life. She started with a small, wooden maquette or model, and contracted a metalworking firm to replicate the maquette in large-size aluminum. The welded sculpture was sandblasted, sprayed with marine primer, painted with polyurethane enamel to match the maquette’s original oil colors, and then coated with clear catalyzed polyurethane used for automobiles.

Nationally recognized as one of the most prominent artists in Louisiana and the South, Kohlmeyer studied art at Tulane University’s Newcomb College, and was an active painter, sculptor, printmaker, and art teacher in New Orleans.

Artist: 
Ida Kohlmeyer
Date: 
1996
Inscriptions: 
Alexandria Museum of Art Collections Endowment and partial Gift of the Ida and Hugh Kohlmeyer Foundation 2002.01
Medium: 
paint and polyurethane enamel on sandblasted aluminum
Dimensions: 
83 x 43 x 19 inches

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